The Clear Button

Extinguishing Worried Thoughts at the Point of Inception

  • Imagine there is a button at the center of your palm that’s connected directly to your brain.  This is the Clear Button. When you push it, it sends a signal that stops worried, stressful thinking.
  • So let’s role play it.  See yourself as anxious and beginning to spin a worried, pessimistic yarn that could easily proliferate into catastrophic thinking.
  • Then you remember the Clear Button. You hold your left hand in front of you, palm facing you. You press the button at the center of your palm and keep pressing it.  As you do this, imagine an electrical signal travels to the lower brain and quiets the negative, worried chatter.
  • Next, you become aware of your breath and you count to three, seeing each number as a color.

Take a breath, count “1,” and see the number as red,

Take a  second breath, count “2,” and see it as blue,

Take a third breath, count “3,” and see it as green.

  • As you exhale on the final breath, you come into the present moment, right here, right now, and you relax, letting go completely. Quietly, re-engage with the situation and consciously choose to be at peace.

The part of the primitive brain in charge of stress reactions is fully developed in a human being at age two. The intelligence of the primitive brain is at the level of a two year old.  When a worried person frets and ruminates over the smallest matter, we often say they’re acting like a two-year-old.  That description is not far from the truth. Neurologically, this is the system that’s in charge.  You don’t use logic or reason on a two year old.  You distract them.  Counting to “3” and seeing the numbers as colors is a form of distraction.

Here’s the benefit: When we’re worried or under stress, all we see are problems. But once we’ve quieted the brain, control will shift from the lower to the higher brain where creative intelligence kicks in.  We start to see solutions.   This simple tool is a powerful first step in rewiring the brain to extinquish worry at the point of inception.

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